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Julian W. Connolly

Julian W. Connolly
Julian W. Connolly

Professor

E-mail:
Phone: 434-924-6682

Address:
273 New Cabell Hall
PO Box 400783
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4783

Curriculum vitae

Research Interests

  • Nineteenth and twentieth-century Russian literature, especially the work of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Vladimir Nabokov
  • Russian and East European cinema
  • Education

    • Bachelor of Arts (BA), Harvard University
    • Master of Arts (MA), Harvard University
    • Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Harvard University

    Selected Publications:

    Books Authored

    • A Reader’s Guide to Nabokov’s Lolita. Brighton, MA: Academic Studies Press, 2009. 186 pp.
    • The Intimate Stranger: Meetings with the Devil in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature. Middlebury Studies in Russian Language and Literature. Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.: New York, 2001.
    • Nabokov’s Early Fiction: Patterns of Self and Other. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992.
    • Ivan Bunin. Boston: G. K. Hall, 1982.

    Books Edited

    • The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
    • Nabokov and His Fiction: New Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
    • Invitation to a Beheading: A Critical Companion. Northwestern University Press / AATSEEL Critical Companions to Russian Literature. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 1997.
    • Studies in Russian Literature in Honor of Vsevolod Setchkarev. Edited with Sonia I. Ketchian. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica, 1987.

    Selected Articles (last ten years)

    • "Confession in The Brothers Karamazov," in Dostoevsky's Brother's Karamazov: Art, Creativity, and Spirituality. Ed. Predrag Cicovacki and Maria Granik. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter GmbH Heidelberg, 2010.
    • “A Close Reading of the Enchanted Hunters Scene.” In Lolita: From Nabokov to Kubrick and Lyne. Ed. Erik Martiny. Paris: Sedes, 2009. 121–31.2.
    • “Dostoevsky’s Guide to Spiritual Epiphany in The Brothers Karamazov.” In F. M. Dostoevsky in the Context of Cultural Dialogues / F. M. Dostoevskij v kontekste dialogicheskogo vzaimodejstvija kul’tur. Ed. Katalin Kroo and Tünde Szabo. Budapest: ELTE PhD Programme “Russian Literature and Literary Studies,” 2009. 113–17.
    • “The Middle Way: Berberova between Bunin and Nabokov.” In American Contributions to the 14th International Congress of Slavists. Vol. 2: Literature. Ed. David Bethea. Bloomington: Slavica, 2008. 41–50.
    • “A World in Flux: Pervasive Instability in Dostoevsky’s The Gambler.” Dostoevsky Studies, New Series 12 (2008): 67–79.
    • “Russian Cultural Contexts for Lolita.” In Approaches to Teaching Nabokov’s Lolita. Ed. Zoran Kuzmanovich and Galya Diment. New York: Modern Language Association, 2008. 89–93.
    • “Dostoevskij’s Guide to Spiritual Epiphany in The Brothers Karamazov.” Studies in East European Thought 59 (2007): 39–54. Also online at http://www.springerlink.com/content/j06521m1172xj0l7/
    • “Why are Nymphets ‘Demonic’?: Remarks on the Cultural Roots of Nabokov’s Lolita.” In The Real Life of Pierre Delalande. Studies in Russian and Comparative Literature to Honor Alexander Dolinin. Stanford Slavic Specialities, vol. 34. Ed. David M. Bethea, Lazar Fleishman, and Alexander Ospovat. Stanford: Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Stanford University, 2007. 2: 674–86.
    • “The Challenge of Interpreting and Decoding Nabokov: Strategies and Suggestions.” Cycnos 24.1 (2007): 155–170.
    • “Nabokov, Pushkin, and Eugene Onegin.” In Nabokofu Yakuchu Evugenii Onegin Chukai [Translation with Commentary of Nabokov’s Translation with Commentary of Eugene Onegin]. Ed. Honyaku No Shoso Kenkyukai [Research Group on “Aspects of Translation”]. Kyoto, Japan: Kyoto Daigaku Daigakuin Bungakukenkyuka, 2007.
    • “Black and White and Dead All Over: Color Imagery in Nabokov’s Prose.” Nabokov Studies 10 (2006): 1–14.
    • “Introduction: The Many Faces of Vladimir Nabokov.” In The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. 1–8.
    • “The Major Russian Novels.” In The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. 135–50.
    • “Ivan Bunin.” In Twentieth-Century Russian Émigré Writers. Ed. Maria Rubins. Dictionary of Literary Biography, vol. 317. Detroit: Thomson–Gale, 2005. 50–62.
    • “Vladimir Nabokov.” In Twentieth-Century Russian Émigré Writers. Ed. Maria Rubins. Dictionary of Literary Biography, vol. 317. Detroit: Thomson–Gale, 2005. 248–68.
    • “The Daedalus–Icarus Theme in Nabokov’s Fiction.” In Nabokov at Cornell. Ed. Gavriel Shapiro. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003. 151–60.
    • “Metamorphosis of a Dreamer: From Dostoevsky’s ‘White Nights’ to Nabokov’s The Eye.” In American Contributions to the Thirteenth International Congress of Slavists. Vol. 2: Literature. Ed. Robert A. Maguire and Alan Timberlake. Bloomington: Slavica, 2003. 31–38.
    • “The Quest for Self-Discovery in Gogol’s ‘Vii.’” Slavic and East European Journal 46.2 (2002): 253–67.
    • “The Elemental Nabokov: The Role of Natural Elements in Nabokov’s Fiction.” Proceedings of the International Vladimir Nabokov Symposium. Online at http://www.nabokovmuseum.org/en/events/conferences/symposium/proceedings/
    • “Nabokov’s Approach to the Supernatural in the Early Stories.” In Torpid Smoke: The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov. Ed. Steven G. Kellman and Irving Malin. Studies in Slavic Literature and Poetics 35. Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000. 21–34.
    • “The ‘Flutter of Fantasy’ in Nabokov’s Early Fiction.” In Vladimir Nabokov-Sirine: les années européenes. Cahiers de l’emigration russe 5 (2000): 45–58.
    • “The Quest for a Natural Melody in the Fiction of Vladimir Nabokov.” In Nabokov at the Limits: Redrawing Critical Boundaries. Ed. Lisa Zunshine. New York: Garland Publishing Inc., 1999. 69–85.
    • “Nabokov at 100.” Introduction to Nabokov and His Fiction: New Perspectives. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 1–12.
    • “Nabokov’s (re)visions of Dostoevsky.” In Nabokov and His Fiction: New Perspectives. Ed. Julian W. Connolly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 141–57.
    • “A New ‘Spirit of Negation’: Danilov the Violist and the Image of the Devil in World Literature.” In American Contributions to the Twelfth International Congress of Slavists. Ed. Robert A. Maguire and Alan Timberlake. Bloomington: Slavica, 1998. 41–51.
    • “To See or Be Seen: The Function of the Gaze in Nabokov’s Russian Fiction.” In And Meaning for a Life Entire: Festschrift for Charles A. Moser on the Occasion of his Sixtieth Birthday. Ed. Peter Rollberg. Bloomington: Slavica, 1998. 269–86.