Slavic Languages and Literatures

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Discover the languages, literatures and cultures of Russia and Eastern Europe.

courtesy of Margarita Nafpaktitis

*We will be moving into our new offices on the second floor of New Cabell Hall in June 2014*

Two Slavic Majors Win Major National Awards

Congratulations to two 2013 graduates who won major fellowships. Hillary Hurd, of Richmond, is the recipient of a Marshall Fellowship. Hillary, who was also the student representative to the University's Board of Visitors, will study International Relations at the University of Cambridge in 2013-14 and at St. Andrews the following year. Ben Bissell, from Fairfax Station, won a Luce Scholarship to study at the Population Research Institute of East China Normal University in Shanghai for a year, after which he intends to pursue a PhD in the political demography of the Slavic world. Both students were Slavic and Politics Honors double majors. Поздравляем!

Student Wins Boren to Study in Russia

Second-year student Samantha Guthrie has won a Boren Scholarship, which is funded by the Department of Defense for study abroad in languages critical to U.S. interests. Samantha will study Russian language, culture, sociology, and history in the School of Russian and Asian Studies at St. Petersburg State University, from January to August, 2014. In exchange for generous support, recipients of the prestigious award commit to at least one year of work with the federal government after graduating.

Graduate Funding

The Slavic Department offers competitive financial aid packages for graduate study. Outstanding applicants are eligible for 5-year support packages at a minimum annual stipend of about $18,000, plus health insurance, for a total of about $20,000 yearly or $100,000 in total. For more information, contact our Director of Graduate Studies, Edith Clowes, at .

Where to Find Us

Starting Fall 2011, the Slavic Department has relocated for 3 years while Cabell Hall undergoes refurbishment. Faculty are in the small building between Halsey Hall and Maury Hall. (On university maps, the building is variously labeled Halsey Annex C, Slavic Annex, or Religious Studies Annex.) Staff and all mailboxes are next door in the basement of Halsey. TA's can be found in both spaces.

Russian House (Русский Дом)

Russian HouseThe Russian House is a Russian-language residential facility for undergraduates and graduate students. It is the hub of cultural and social life for students and faculty affiliated with the Department.

Tea and Conversation

Alternating Tuesdays during the Fall and Spring semesters 7:00 P.M. - 9:00 P.M. at the Russian House

More on Russian House:

 

 

Slavic instructor, Andy Kaufman, discusses his course, "Books Behind Bars", on local radio podcast, With Good Reason (begins at 14:22)

 

Recent Graduate Student Publications

Michael Marsh-Soloway - "Unseen Beauty, Shadows of Liminal Space, and the Caustic Passions of Exile: The Life and Writings of M. Yu. Lermontov", Critical Insights: Russia's Golden Age, 2014.

Kathleen Thompson - "Stranger in a Familiar Land: Gary Shteyngart's Evolving Search for Self," Brown Slavic Contributions, Spring 2013.

Reed Johnson - "The Unread: The Mystery of the Voynich Manuscript," The New Yorker Online, July 2013.

Reed Johnson - "If Holden Caulfield Spoke Russian," The New Yorker Online, September, 2013.

Katya Jordan - "Dunia’s Progress, Samson’s Decline, and Pushkin’s Modernity: Decrypting the German Pictures in 'The Stationmaster," Ulbandus, 2013.

 

 

 

2013-2014 Talks

KATERINA CLARK, Yale University. October 25, 2013, 4:30. Monroe 118. On her book, "Transposing the 'Great Game' to the Sphere of Culture: Soviet-Indian Cultural Interactions in the 1920's"

SYMPOSIUM: In the Shadow of Stalin: African American Artists and Intellectuals in Soviet Russia. October 26, 2013, starting at 10:00. Campbell 153. Scholars from several disciplines will discuss the experience of African Americans who visited and worked in the Soviet Union during the Stalin era. Accompanying exhibit at the UVa Fralin Museum of Art. More information.

ALEKSANDAR HEMON, writer. October 28, 2013, 5:00. Harrison Institute. Award-winning Bosnian-American fiction writer and recipient of MacArthur Fellowship who has contributed to The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The New York Times and The New Republic.

PAUL GRANT, Memorial University of Newfoundland. November 14, 2013, 11:00. Newcomb Hall Room 480. "Comedies of the Flesh: Sexual Humor in Nabokov."

MARIA IVANOVA, PhD in Philosophy, Moscow State University. November 25, 2013, 4:15. Cocke 115. "Ars Dissimulandi: The Early Modern Ruthenian Art of Dissimulation in Byzantine Perspective." The theory and practice of dissimulation as a rhetorical technique in what is now Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, and Poland in the 16th and 17th centuries.

BETH HOLMGREN, Duke University. February 20, 2014, 5:00pm. Monroe 122." A Refining Palette: Children’s Book Illustration in Poland, 1960s-1970s." This lecture/show demonstrates how Polish illustrator conditioned children to envision more playful worlds than the drab one in which they lived, connecting them early on with the fantastic, the theatrical, and the absurd.

ELENA PROKHOROVA, Associate Professor of Russian Studies, College of William and Mary, March 27, 2014, 5:00pm, Monroe Hall 122. "Ugly Betty on Red Square: Global Formats and Russian Television."

 

Recent Faculty Publications

PDF document icon Resources for Russian Archival Research and Bibliographic Materials (.pdf, 84KB)

UVa Slavic Languages and Literatures Newsletter, Fall 2013

Russian Play Video Recordings

Society of Slavic Graduate Students Newsletter Archive