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Guest Artists

In addition to offering Artist Minigrants, Rising Third and Fourth-Year Arts Awards, and direct connections to our arts faculty members, the Miller Arts Scholars program also invites guest artists to meet with our students and work within our arts departments.  These artists are working professionals who are making significant contributions to the disciplines of Dance, Music, Theater, Studio Art, and Creative Writing. Guest artists help our students make important professional connections and imagine their work's potential beyond grounds.

2017-2018 Visiting Artists

Marjani FortéMarjani Forté, Dance

Fortè-Saunders' work has been presented at many theaters, centers, and in partnership with communities across the United States and in the New York Triborough area including Danspace Project, the Kelly Strayhorn Theatre in Pittsburgh, PA, Movement Research at Judson Church, New Orleans Mckenna Museum, Harlem Stage, The Pillsbury Theatre in Minneapolis, Spelman College, Pomona College, and Hunter College City University of New York. With a commitment to culturally driven performance art, that ignites positive, equitable action, stirs the human soul, and speaks bravely against injustice Fortè-Saunders’ work has flourished into a bouquet of practices, which include teaching and lecture, community organizing/partnership, choreography, master classes in contemporary technique and improvisation, and research driven engagement that seeks to satisfy and inspire artistic development and structural critique.
Visit: http://marjaniforte.org

Warren CragheadWarren Craghead, Studio Art

His work explores the absurd idea of how to be everywhere; It insists that art can be accessible, cryptic, and beautiful all at the same time. His drawings, collages, paintings, book and mail art are inspired by his experience in the ordinary world. They contain spontaneous "without thinking" narratives that process and encode everyday life and the written word into discrete, pictographic, nonlinear stories that can be encountered everywhere: a sticker on a pole, a booklet in a newspaper, a postcard in the mail, an image on a website, a collage in a gallery.
Visit: http://craghead.com

Nicole-Gurgel SeefeldtNicole-Gurgel Seefeldt, Drama

Nicole-Gurgel Seefeldta is a performer and poet, arts organizer and activist. She's created original performances around issues of homelessness, immigration, and racial justice in Minnesota, Virginia, Texas, and New Mexico. In 2012, she graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with an MFA in Performance as Public Practice, and has worked with Alternate ROOTS since 2013, supporting the work of artist-activists throughout the South and beyond. She is Midwestern by birth and makes her home in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This event is cosponsored with the Department of Drama and its Dance Program and the University of Virginia Arts and Sciences' Collective Response Moving Forward Fund.
Visit: https://www.gurgel-seefeldt.com

Paul BrodyPaul Brody, Music

Paul Brody is an American trumpeter, composer, sound installation artist, and writer based in Berlin, Germany. His work explores the relationship between the spoken word and melody through performance, composition, radio art, and sound installations. Brody leads his klezmer-jazz band, Sadawi and has collaborated with artists as diverse as John Zorn, Wim Wenders, and Barry White. He is a regular member of the avant-garde theater troupe of Hungarian-born director David Marton. Citing influences from Joseph Beuys, Charles Ives, Samuel Beckett, and the Art Ensemble of Chicago, along with the story and folklore collecting traditions of Studs Terkel and Alan Lomax, Brody uses oral history to create word and sound-orientated narratives from documentary material. “A story is a melody and a melody is a story,” Brody explained in an interview with Der Tagesspiegel. His installation work generally examines the relationship between voice-melody and identity and the notion of home. Brody believes that while words carry one meaning, the voice-melody can be heard as carrying its own independent narrative. Voices speaking one language with the melody of another language contain infinitely more complex parallel narratives. In addition, the voice-melody reveals both impersonal and personal information: origin, family history, travels, but also emotional state and physical condition. This event was cosponsored by McIntire Department of Music, James Dunton Gift (Jazz Program), UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, the Center for German Studies, the Dept. of Germanic Languages and Literatures, the Drama Department, the Creative Writing Program, the Anthropology Department, and the Linguistics Program.
Visit: http://paulbrody.net